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support the inflammatory flames heard on the floor of the u.s. senate used to block a u.n. treaty. a treaty meant to improve the lives of millions of disabled people around the world. hundreds of millions. the treaty is called the united nations conventions on the rights of persons with disabilities. it was modeled on the americans with disabilities act. the treaty was meant to encourage other countries to be more like the u.s. on the issue of equal rights for the disabled. also disabled americans who visit or live in other countries could potentially benefit from the u.n. treaty. 125 countries ratified it. but on tuesday, 38 u.s. republican senators voted against it. there names are right there. some of them flip-flopped at the last minute. some had signaled support for the treaty and then indicated they'd vote for it only to vote against it. one of the measure's co-sponsored, jerry mirrand, actually voted against it. so the guy who co-sponsored it voted against it. we asked him to come on the program yesterday, today as well. he declined. a former senator got involved on this as
on the first part of that. >> democracy now! questions u.s. climate negotiator jonathan pershing about criticism of the failure to do more to cut emissions and save the planet from catastrophic climate change. we will speak with ronny jumeau and martin khor of the south centre in malaysia, and then anjali appadurai. >> you have been negotiating my whole life, you have failed to meet targets and a broken promises. >> a year after calling on world figures to do more to save the planet, the 22-year-old american college student was banned from the climate talks here in doha for the first week. she joins us today h. then we look at how the koch brothers are influencing climate policy.politic this is democracy now!, democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. the death toll from a massive typhoon in the southern philippines has doubled to more than 270 people. typhoon bopha is the most southerly typhoon ever recorded in the western pacific and the strongest to hit the philippines this year. 80,000 people have been forced to flee their homes. we will have more from doha after
than 10,000 kilometers capable of reaching the u.s. west coast. experts used data from previous launches to make their estimate. they say a missile launched in 2009 had a range of almost 7,000 kilometers. north korean officials tried again in april. the rocket exploded shortly after takeoff. seconds longer tn those used 18 inrevious attempts. the experts believe engineers may have succeeded in reducing the size of a nuclear warhead. south korean officials say workers have completed the assembly of the three-stage missile. they say once the crew injects the fuel, it will be ready to go. authorities in pyongyang say they've launch between the 10th and 22nd of this month. they say they're sending a satellite into orbit. but leaders of japan and other countries believe the north koreans are carrying out a test of a long-range ballistic missile. the senior u.s. diplomat on north korea has warned the leadership there. he said the u.s. will refer the matter to the u.n. security council if they go ahead with the launch. >> we will be prepared to work with our partners, including at the
that might support the inflammatory claims heard on the floor of the u.s. senate that were used to block a u.n. treaty, a treaty meant to improve the lives of millions of disabled people around the entire world. now, the treaty is called the united nations conventions on the rights of persons with disabilities and it was modeled on the americans with disabilities act. now, the treaty was meant to encourage other countries to be more like the u.s. on the issue of equal rights for the disabled. also disabled americans or vets who visit or live in other countries could potentially benefit from the treaty. 125 countries ratified the treaty but on tuesday, 38 u.s. republicans, senators, voted against it. their names right there on the right of the screen. some of them flip-flopped at the last minute, some senators had actually signaled support for the treaty, then indicated that they would vote for it only to vote against it. one of the actual measures co-sponsors of it, he actually voted against it. one of the co-sponsors. amazing. he voted against the bill he had co-sponsored. we asked him to c
korea telex its first female president. she has pledged to help the ailing economy. >>> u.s. president barack obama says he wants concrete proposals on gun control presented to him by the end of next month. >> after the school shooting and connecticut, president obama said he was prepared to put the full weight of his office behind this issue. we now know how he plans to do that. these are the victims, three more children buried in newtown, conn., today, a teacher who tried to save them laid to rest as well. now politicians are talking about how to prevent another mass killing of children in their classrooms. >> we have a deep obligation, all of us, to try. >> not president obama has put vice president joe biden in charge, saying that he will outline his proposals next month. >> the good news is there is a growing consensus to build on, with a majority of support banning the sale of military- style assault weapons, a majority support the ammunition clips. that the president says that gun-control legislation will be part of it, but he is not saying, and nobody asked, if he is considerin
in the u.s., but we did it and we were condemned by the u.s., the state department. we were condemned by the u.n. years later, people appreciated the grave issue he took was for the benefit of the american people. because then you invade iraq come you are able to go into iraq without the risk of the iraqi nuclear. thus go back to 1973. i'm sure some jewish people and the audience and for us, the jewish people yom kippur is the holiest day of the year, where we go to the shore, we pray 1973 turn yom kippur. even though i thought i knew everything before i wrote the book. when i was doing the research i learned myself a lot. i found out 1973 congress by surprise, were almost an appointment would've lost the war. in the middle of the war, we can go to the sea. it's not the war in vietnam or afghanistan. it means rout of the game to make it to a crucial point in the first day of the war that we were invaded from both france and in washington sent a telegram to the embassies, which is not far away and i might telegram there was a message from kissinger, secretary of the state department, t
it plan b. tax cut aimed atmi keeping the u.s. from the fiscal cliff. the plan is expected to be rejected by the senate. if the parties cannot agree by the end of the year, many are predicting chaos. >> it is an exercise in republican vote counting that will not result in anything for the american people. it cannot pass the senate. the president would veto it if it got to his desk. plan b, which is the only thing the house of representatives and the republicans are focused on now, a multi day exercise in utility, at a time when we do not have the luxury of exercises in futility. >> president obama and senate democrats have not done much of anything. their plan b is to slow what does over the fiscal cliff. for weeks they said they would make substantial expansions on spending cuts. i did my part. they have done nothing. >> the stalemate is moving the u.s. economy towards a so-called who fiscal cliff if agreement cannot be reached. it is expected to cause the economy to shrink close to 4% of gross domestic product. some fear it will lead to a recession. many economists are calling for a lon
of libya's ire -- ire veal -- irrelevance of u.s. policy. go back to the libyan's fate, one, the u.s. relations with lip ya has been, you know, u.s. has always looked at libya as something of a strange creature that we could use for certain -- as a piece, of a strategy that had to do with the region as a whole. it was never looked at -- it was never seen as an object in and of itself. could start with the relation of the soviets, the eisenhower doctrine, and the united states' desire to push back soviet influence. libya was desperately pleading for u.s. attention back then, for aid, to get itself together, to stand on its own feet. this was before the discovery of oil, and the u.s. took a, well, you know, you're not really important as e just a minute, for example, and, you know, we'll think about it, and the result was that the prime minister of the time, you know, basically devised a plan to court the soviets and see if he could grab the united states' attention, and that happened. the next, you know, major event was the libya's and gadhafi's successful bid to change drastically th
for putting the alliance with the u.s. in danger by flip-flopping on relocating american bases. you know, opposition parties will be making these same arguments to voters. >> so how do you rate the opposition's chances of winning? >> mm-hmm. recent polls suggest that main opposition leader democrats could regain power. you know, leader shinzo abe has already served as a prime minister in 2006 and '07. he says he would not yield in territorial fight with china and would increase defense spending if necessary. at the same time, he said he would do more to mend economic ties. he said if deflation persists he might delay the hike in the consumption tax. he has piled the pressure on the central bank to do more to ease monetary policy. he has said the government policy of phasing out nuclear power by the 2030s is unrealistic and irresponsible. >> so how about all these new parties that we're hearing about? >> well, voters who are tired of the establishment could support what are known as the third force. former tokyo governor shintaro ishihara leads the restoration party. its candidates are as
by a bank to u.s. authorities. hsbc admitted on tuesday its anti-money laundering measures had been inadequate. the bank agreed to pay the penalties to u.s. authorities including the justice department. the bank says it accepts responsibility for past mistakes and has beefed up its internal controls. in july, a u.s. senate report accused the bank of being involved in money transfers linked to drug deals originating in mexico. the report also said the bank settled money transactions with links to iran, a country under u.s. sanctions. >>> now, british authorities have arrested three british men. that's over their alleged connection to a rate-fixing scandal involving libor, the london interbank offered rate. the serious fraud office announced tuesday the first arrests in the case that has rocked the financial community. but officials gave no details other than the arrested men are british citizens in their 30s or 40s. 's unknown whether the suspects worked for banks or what their exact charges are. in june, the nation's financial regulators imposed a huge fine on barclays bank based in
him. he has had a series of health problems in recent years. a shake-up at the u.s. state department. who is out of a job following the findings of a security investigation. women using technology to build their business. the those headlines in just a moment. >> it is a very unsettled picture across europe. we have this area of low pressure. this frontal system giving some torrential rainfall. and improvement here but on the forward edge of this frontal system there is likely to be some snow extending down toward the alpine region. some shower weather for the u.k. and much of france, too. over eastern parts of europe seeing cloudy skies, outbreaks of rain. -14 degrees is expected in moscow. we have a fairly brisk, northwesterly wind making an impact all the way down towards sudan seeing temperatures below average at 29 degrees. as we move into central parts of africa, while the monsoon rains are pushing further, a decent amount of rain is being reported but generally you see the rainfall pushing away from the democratic republic of the," . -- of congo. >> the french president, presid
of u.s. officials, the belief that's happened. we'll talk it over next.  >>> welcome back. we have important breaking news to tell you about right now. nbc news is reporting u.s. officials say their worst fears have been confirmed that the syrian military has loaded chemical weapons inside bombs. nbc says those same officials say bashar al assad's forces are awaiting final order to use those loaded missiles against syria's own people. this video posted online, which we can't independently verify, purports to show syrian missiles that have been modified to carry chemical and biological weapons. obviously, this is a sobering development in a situation that seems to be getting worse by the day. pentagon correspondent barbara starr joins me now, along with cnn contributor and former cia officer bob baer and on the phone, fran townsend. barbara, i know you're working to confirm this nbc report. how much would this change the situation? if u.s. military is going to act to prevent assad from gassing his own people, it would seem, if they loaded this stuff into weapons, the time to do
. the longer this goes on, the bigger that challenge is. >> is your warning for u.s. action or action in conjunction? >> the secretary is urgently meeting with russian representatives and lots of elements of the state department are meeting with our alies. the potential for recognition of the new syrian national council is something we would be doing, a step our alies have taken. i commend ambassador ford for their leadership on the plementic side to deal with this grinding, painful, two-year-long conflict. the differences are far less important than the commonality, which the president has made a clear declaration, which we will back. thank you. captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] >> you are going to hear from senator leiberman at the foundation for defense of democracy. they are hosting a forum called "dictators and dissidents." we'll take you live to the event with remarks from incoming chairman ed royce and senator bob casey and talking about syria and tensions in iran coming up in a few minutes. we will b
alarmed people in neighboring countries. senior officials have met with their u.s. counterparts to coordinate their response. south korea's chief nuclear negotiator and the head of the japanese foreign ministries headed to washington. they met with u.s. special representative on north korea, glen davies. they will continue diplomatic efforts until the last minute. >> translator: we also agreed that the international community should take firm action if north korea goes ahead with the launch. >> sugiyama said he hopes to visit beijing to discuss the matter with chinese officials. >> they're ignored warnings over the year when they went ahead with a launch that ended in failure. covering the korean peninsula, we see why leaders in the north are pushing ahead despite opposition. >> reporter: the ballistic missile launch will be the second since kim jong-un took power a year ago. it will use the same launch pad, a site in the northwestern part of the country. before the first testing, officials said the three-stage rocket was meant to carry a satellite. but japan and the u.s. and so
, corruption scandals, and disastrous investments in the u.s. and brazil. it was hoping to benefit from lower production costs at the new steel plant near rio de janeiro. the costs to build the facility have spiraled out of control. billions of euros wasted. it is a similar picture in the u.s. where a costly steel plant is incurring heavy losses due to the steel downturn. investment decisions have weighed heavily with building costs rising to 12 billion euro. to make matters worse, they have been hit with huge funds in their real division. this has triggered a leadership crisis. the executive board has asked three top executives to leave. >> until now, there has been in management style where the old boys' network was more important than corporate success. to some extent, this led to ignoring irregularities rather than correcting them. >> despite the crisis, he is trying to reverse the fortunes. they plan to sell the troubled plants in the u.s. and reduce their presence in the risky steel sector. they are examining all options. >> for more rainiers on the reaction from traders, we have this r
.5 billion in penalties. regulators in the u.s., u.k. and sorts when charged ubs and manipulating a key interest rate known as libor. >> his was person -- pervasive manipulation of global benchmark interest rates by dozens of staff across three continents. and the heavy fine reflects the regulator's concerns. the ubs chief executives said those of all but the extent of the fraud and bribes maybe revealed by further criminal investigations. in just one instance revealed by the u.k. financial services authority, ubs made corrupt payments of around $24,000 a quarter for 18 months to brokers to thank them for helping them manipulate the global industry. libor is used to price more than $350 trillion of contracts around the world. potential losers include pension funds, insurance companies, and individuals. more than a dozen banks have been caught up in an international inquiry and there are more cases to come. >> i would imagine there are probably more skeletons in the covered, and that really think that some point policy makers and regulators need to start focusing on the fact that we will
less. >> warner: and we talk with ambassador marc grossman about prospects for afghanistan as the u.s. prepares to withdraw troops by 2014 and as he leaves his post as u.s. special envoy to the region. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: violence continued across syria today as the united states welcomed a russian admission that syria's rebels may succeed in overthrowing president bashar al-assad. syrian state television showed >> woodruff: for more on all of this we turn to vitaly churkin, russia's ambassador to the united nations. thank you for joining us. let me begin by asking you about the comment today made by your deputy foreign minister mr. bog don november. he said today "it is impossible to exclude a victory of the syrian opposition." how would you describe
and about u.s. ambassador susan rice's decision to take her name out of consideration to be secretary of state. >> woodruff: then, we turn to the fiscal crisis here at home. andrew kohut explains the latest poll numbers, showing strong support for the way president obama is handling the negotiations. >> the democrats are better regarded in this negotiation than the republicans by a lot. >> warner: plus ray >> warner: plus, ray suarez gets two views on proposals to raise the age of eligibility for medicare to 67, from 65. >> woodruff: it's bottoms up tonight for miles o'brien who reports on genetic links to alcoholism and other addictions. >> so far as i know, there's no law against reporting under the influence, so here goes something. >> warner: and we talk with ambassador marc grossman about prospects for afghanistan as the u.s. prepares to withdraw troops by 2014 and as he leaves his post as u.s. special envoy to the region. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. b
. >> in the deadliest rampage at an elementary school in u.s. history, 20 kindergarten students and six staff members of the school are killed in newtown, connecticut. >> i have been at this for one- third of a century, and my sensibilities may not be of the average man, but this probably is the worst i have seen or the worst that i know of any of my colleagues have seen. >> the massacre occurred in newtown, connecticut, just miles from the national shooting sports foundation, the nation's second most powerful pro-gun lobby in the country after the national rifle association. we will host a debate on gun control between the gun honors for america and the coalition to stop gun violence. then we will speak to paul barrett, author of, "glock: the rise of america's gun." and we will get a report from the streets of cairo from sharif abdel kouddous. >> of voting among the division. egyptians headed to the polls on saturday in the sixth national election in nearly two years. this time, to vote on a referendum and a hotly disputed constitution. >> all of that and more coming up. this is "democracy now!," de
troops on it is side of the militarize zone separating from south korea. as well as nearly 30,000 u.s. forces. not only are they within strikes distance of the launch site, a long-range rocket shows north korea is on its way to developing technology to launch a rocket at the united states's west coast and hawaii. officials tell cnn that the working assumption is that the north koreans got outside help from others, including iran. so today's launch is raising some huge concerns. let's go to our pentagon correspondent barbara starr. i assume they are pretty surprised and alarmed by the successful launch over at the pentagon? >> look, wolf, because of everything you just mentioned, indeed, the u.s. military, the intelligence committee have been watching north korea for days now 24/7 because they did expect to launch and they announced it. but they were having technical problems so a lot thought it wouldn't happen until next week. when it happened last week, there was a surprise. the north korean anchor's excitement was clear. >> announcing the launch of a long-range rocket that put a nor
prospects for afghanistan as the u.s. prepares to withdraw troops by 2014 and as he leaves his post as u.s. special envoy to the region. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: violence continued across syria today as the united states welcomed a russian admission that syria's rebels may succeed in overthrowing president bashar al-assad. we may have a problem with that tape and we apologize. we'll try and get it together. if we're not able to -- we're going to go ahead and interview right now mr. vitaly churkin. he is russia's ambassador to the united
, outperformers this year include german, japanese and hong kong stocks. the u.s. senate will meet at 11:00 a.m. eastern after lawmakers tried most of sunday to avoid a fiscal cliff. proposals moved back and forth including tying social security to the chained cpi index. aides say talks between harry reid and mitch mcconnell focus on extending middle class tax breaks and renewing unemployment benefits. president obama says the u.s. markets and economy will suffer if congress fails to act. and here is what the major players had to say at least publicly this weekend. >> if you look at projections of 2013, people generally felt that the economy would continue to grow, unemployment would continue to tick down, housing would continue to improve, but what's been holding us back is the dysfunction here in washington. >> the sticking point appears to be a willingness, and interest or frankly, the courage to close the deal. >> i will say this. i think that the republican leader has shown absolutely good faith. it's just that we are apart on some pretty big issues. >> i want everyone to know i'm willin
senator mark warner on his plan to allow more highly-skilled immigrants into the u.s. at 8 eastern on c-span2, the president and incoming ceo of the nation's second biggest provider of medicare health plans, and at 8 eastern on c-span3, a discussion on scientific predictions about the future and the impact they have on public policy. .. but i think that there's no other art form so readily accessible other than perhaps film, which we work with, too. but it is something -- there is something in literature that just captures the human spirit. >> this weekend, we look behind the scenes at the history and literary life of new york's capital city, albany. saturday at noon eastern on booktv own c-span2, and sunday at 5:00 p.m. on american history tv on c-span3. >> now, a former iranian political prisoner talks about the abuse she suffered. she is joined bay former obama administration at visor on iran who discusses iran's program. the foundation for the defense of democracies held this event. >> good morning. it's a very interesting panel so i want to get quickly into questions. very quickly
before she said anything different and that was to u.s. senators behind closed doors, but it took 73 days forler to speak out, not even publicly, but behind closed doors. >> i i don't think she would have ever said she was wrong. this is not about susan rice. the president said, if you have a problem with benghazi -- i do -- it is not picking on the president. it is trying to expose a national security failure, a debacle. i hold the president accountable more than anythingch -- more than anyone else. it should have been closed or reinforced before the attack on 9/11. there is nothing to do to help the people. where was he as commandener chief. have you two movies being made in the raid on bin laden. you don't know anything about what the president did in the seven hours of the attack. and afterward, the president tried to blame this on a video and a mob and a demonstration that never existed. but susan rice, in my opinion, misled the public. there are other problems with her time and politics and national foreign affairs arena. her problems were deeper than me and deeper than benghazi. bu
night. we will have more on u.s. gun violence in the newtown massacre after headlines. egyptian voters headed to the polls on saturday in a referendum on a controversial draft constitution. according to unofficial preliminary results, the document passed the first round with 57% of the vote with the turnout of just 31%. a second round scheduled for this saturday in remaining areas. a coalition of human rights groups has called for revoked citing thousands of complaints of violations at the polls including a lack of full judicial supervision. at a news conference, the opposition national salvation front accused authorities of rigging the outcome. >> [indiscernible] >> we will have more from egypt with sharif abdel kouddous later in the broadcast. at least 25 people have reportedly been killed in the latest syrian government bombing of a palestinian refugee camp in damascus. the attack on the district comes amidst fears the syrian military is preparing a full on ground assault to displace rebels from their positions. during a visit to neighboring lebanon, the u.n. high commissioner for r
of the inauguration of the president of the u.s. capitol. >> we are glad you are all here, this is the platform were the inauguration will take place. it is on schedule, it is on budget. our job, senator alexander and myself were in charge of this part of the inauguration. it is the presidential inaugural committee. it is also known as pic. let me review some numbers and specifics. the first inaugural on the west front was ronald reagan's ceremony in 1981. the person in charge of building the platform is steve ayers, the architect of the capital. the platform will be about 10,000 square feet. the same size as the platform in 2005, which was the largest platform ever built. as you know, on this there will be 1600 people were comes to this platform. it has to be very strong. the former president, joins you, governors, and the diplomatic corps. one of which comes from brooklyn, one comes from near chattanooga. it is a bipartisan concept inaugural. the platform is made whole with specification so everyone can see pretty well. the design began more than a year ago. construction began in september. >> tha
. and the head of the u.s. gold lobby goes on -- the u.s. gun lobby goes on television to defend his position that guns should be in every school. and trouble in south africa. hello there. welcome to the program. all they were trying to do was buy bread. it turned into a tragedy in central syria. dozens of people are reported to have died when the bakery they were queuing at was destroyed. the un envoy arrived in syria for more talks. we have this. >> panic, chaos, anger. this is the aftermath of what the opposition says was an air strike carried out by a syrian fighter jet. those killed and wounded were queueing outside a bakery. only five days ago, this area was under the control of government forces. the rebels recently opened a new battle for this section of central syria. the state still has superior firepower to the strike back. the government says it is willing to engage in dialogue, but the other side is not. >> i have general advice. time is getting short. hurry and move toward us. these military efforts to topple the government are not getting rid of the president or occupying the c
by the senate. a treaty that was meant to encourage more countries to be more like the u.s. on equal rights of the disabled. if other countries adopted better treatment of their disabled, americans who visited or lived in other countries would also benefit. 125 countries ratified the treaty. it was supported by george bush, signed by the current president, and has support from both sides of the aisle like john mccain and bob dole. he was wheeled onto the senate floor, you can see, for the vote he hoped to see the treaty ratified. instead after pressure from special interest groups, 38 republicans vowing to support the treaty voted no. one was the home school legal defense association. the hslda, the powerful lobby group around the country whose leader you're about to meet. they have some very strong things to say about the treaty, but the notion was basically this, if it were to pass, they said, the u.n. treaty would somehow let the u.n. mandate how parents of disabled kids in america cared for their children. americans among the center is echoing that center is mike lee of utah. keeping th
's look at the facts. according to the u.n.'s office on drugs and crime, the u.s. gun homicide rate is 30 times that of france or australia. it is 12 times higher than the average for other developed countries. why is that? if psychology is the main course, we should see that we have 12 times as many psychologically disturbed people as the average. we don't. in fact, america takes mental disorders seriously, treats them and doesn't stigmatize them. we do better in this area than most of our peers. is america's popular culture much worse than other rich countries? not really since it's largely the same popular culture worldwide. england and wales are exposed to cultural influences as the u.s. yet, their rate of gun homicide is some 3% of ours. the japanese are at the cutting edge of the world of video games, yet the u.n. puts their gun homicide rate at close to zero. why? well, they have one of the most restrictive series of gun laws in the world. when looking internationally, it is obvious that the one feature of america that would explain why we have so much more gun violence than the re
with the u.s. think you, i yield back. >> mr. affleck, i think you have raised a central issue, the lack of security among the population. right now we are relying upon congolese government to provide as security. in afghanistan, we've got a questionable partner in the karzai government. that has been difficult. we have a less than credible partner in the congolese government. in afghanistan, we have gone through these stabilization operations as an alternative way to provide security at the local level with the villages, communities, whereby we have been providing some arms and training to the local population there so that they can provide their own security. obviously, the karzai government has been opposed to that. are there any opportunities for any alternative strategies, given the nature of the in theese government any d drc, mr. affleck? >> i will yield to an expert fellow panelist year, but one of the -- the basic issue, and one that will go a long way and that i alluded to earlier, climbing some influence to president -- are applying some influence to president kabila so that p
, international crisis group and the u.s. institute of peace. he has helped fund schools in darfur in refugee camps, now belongs to a satellite project with george clooney. mr. prendergast has worked for peace in africa for well over a quarter of a century. then we will hear from mvemba dizolele, who is a visiting fellow at stanford university's hoover institution, and professor, lecture and african studies at johns hopkins university school of advanced international studies. mr. dizolele has testified several times before the congress. his work has appeared frequently in many major news publications, and he is a frequent commentator on african affairs on television and radio. he served as election monitor in the drc in 2006, and again in 2011. and has also been indicted with united nations peacekeepers as a reporter. in addition, he is a veteran of the united states marine corps. thank you for your service. and i'd like to now go to steve hege. >> chairman smith, ranking member bass, and members of the subcommittee on africa's global health and human rights, thank you for this invitation to
. board of education. the issue the u.s. supreme court agreed to take on that will make history. >> all of those who argued for nonintervention because of the things that might happen have now happened because we failed to intervene. >>> when is enough enough? that is the question many are asking about syria, as the death toll climbs and concerns mount over chemical weapons. now some lawmakers are saying it may be too late to stop mass destruction. >>> and a toddler taken from the only parents she ever knew because of a little known federal law. now they're fighting to get her back, and may be on their way to the supreme court. i'll talk with them live. >>> good morning, everyone. i'm randi kaye. it is 10:00 on the east coast, 7:00 on the west. thanks so much for starting your day with us. it was supposed to be just for laughs. humor. the listeners with a lighthearted prank. two radio deejays called the london hospital where the duchess of cambridge was being treated and tricked a nurse to get details about her condition. two days later, that nurse, 46-year-old jacintha saldanha, took h
. >>> the senior u.s. diplomat on north korea has warned the leadership there. he said the u.s. will refer the matter to the u.n. security council if they go ahead with the launch. >> we will be prepared to work with our partners, including the united nations security council, to respond in a swift, effective, and credible manner. >> davies said the u.s. could strengthen sanctions. he said existing penalties have already hampered north korea's nuclear program. davies has been holding discussions with his counterparts from china as well as japan and south korea. he said he hopes the chinese can use their influence with their allies in pyongyang. >>> south korean foreign minister kim sung hwan has criticized north korea for spending more than $500 million on missile development. kim told a parliamentary committee that north korea is believed to have spent $400 million to build the tongchang-ri launch site and another $150 million for a missile plant outside pyongyang. unification minister yu woo-ik said the north has scheduled its next launch around the anniversary of the death of kim jong-i
. >> shepard: u.s. officials say they have recently spotted the syrian military moving around chemical weapons components. syria is believed to have enormous stockpiles of chemical weapons, gases that can kill people by raising blisters on their lungs or shutting down their nervous systems. as bashar assad's regime gross desperate the chances of him unleashing those weapons are growing. the fighting that began last year in syria has killed at least 40,000 people. if president assad gives the go ahead for the chemical weapons attacks it's hard to predict how many more would dyed. we have team fox coverage tonight jonathan hunt at the united nations first to james rosen at the state department and to james nato is taking steps to minimize the amount landing outside of syria. >> that's right, shep. the foreign ministers of the military alliance gathered in brussels today and announced there that they have approved a request made by member state turkey which asked for u.s.-made patriot antimissile batteries to be installed along its southern border syria. the ministry made clear the systems are pu
as an independent. he ran for the u.s. senate two years ago as an independent but lost to marco rubio and served as governor of florida as a republican. sum are speculating crist made this latest move in preparation for a run against incumbent florida governor rick scott in 2014. >>> lawmakers want answers about what that deadly depth seventh attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi, libya is all about. soon they may hear from secretary of state hillary clinton. she will testify before a house committee on a state department report expected next week. u.s. ambassador to libya chris stevens and three other americans were killed when the consulate was stormed three months ago. >>> in britain, a prank call from an australian radio station to the hospital treating the duchess of cambridge has turned tragic. two deejays called the hospital, tricked a nurse to get information about katherine's condition. well, that nurse was found dead friday of an apparent suicide. she leaves behind a husband and two children. > the two deejays are suspended and the ceo of the station's parent company says he's confi
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